Noumenon

Noumenon

"Know thyself!"

When people call me ‘sehroo,’my pet name, I automatically feel infinitely closer to them. Loved.

(No, I didn’t forget zahari, or zahari safari, or safawwwi, or sehripoo/sahripoo)

It’s very intimate.

Today, the United States is No. 1 in billionaires, No. 1 in corporate profits, No. 1 in CEO salaries, NO. 1 in childhood poverty and NO. 1 in income and wealth inequality in the industrialized world.

Senator Bernie Sanders. (via nzingasconquests)

Great

(via finest-ruca-in-aztlan)

(Source: curvesincolor, via bankston)

s-c-i-guy:

Researchers discover protein’s ability to inhibit HIV release
A family of proteins that promotes virus entry into cells also has the ability to block the release of HIV and other viruses, University of Missouri researchers have found.

"This is a surprising finding that provides new insights into our understanding of not only HIV infection, but also that of Ebola and other viruses," said Shan-Lu Liu, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor in the MU School of Medicine’s Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology.
The study was recently published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Liu, the corresponding author of the study, is also an investigator with the Christopher S. Bond Life Sciences Center at MU.
According to estimates from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than one million Americans currently are living with AIDS. AIDS, which stands for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, is a condition characterized by progressive failure of the immune system. It is caused by the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1).
When HIV-1 or any virus infects a cell, it replicates and spreads to other cells. One type of cellular protein—T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain, or TIM-1—has previously been shown to promote entry of some highly pathogenic viruses into host cells. Now, the MU researchers have found that the same protein possesses a unique ability to block the release of HIV-1 and Ebola virus.
read more

s-c-i-guy:

Researchers discover protein’s ability to inhibit HIV release

A family of proteins that promotes virus entry into cells also has the ability to block the release of HIV and other viruses, University of Missouri researchers have found.

"This is a surprising finding that provides new insights into our understanding of not only HIV infection, but also that of Ebola and other viruses," said Shan-Lu Liu, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor in the MU School of Medicine’s Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology.

The study was recently published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Liu, the corresponding author of the study, is also an investigator with the Christopher S. Bond Life Sciences Center at MU.

According to estimates from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than one million Americans currently are living with AIDS. AIDS, which stands for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, is a condition characterized by progressive failure of the immune system. It is caused by the type 1 (HIV-1).

When HIV-1 or any virus infects a cell, it replicates and spreads to other cells. One type of cellular protein—T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain, or TIM-1—has previously been shown to promote entry of some highly pathogenic viruses into host cells. Now, the MU researchers have found that the same protein possesses a unique ability to block the release of HIV-1 and Ebola virus.

read more

(via knowledgeequalsblackpower)

I love the Buddha’s simple definition of enlightenment as “the end of suffering.” There is nothing superhuman in that, is there?

—Eckhart Tolle (via thecalminside)

(via inhabitude)

Someone be a dear and hit the pharmacy for me. I’ll give you a list.

oh you kids are so funny

shawnfshareef:


Lebanese citizens watching Hezbollah leader Hassan Nasrallah on television as smoke rises from Israeli attacks aimed at Hezbollah strongholds in Beirut’s southern suburbs, 2006.
Credit: AP

shawnfshareef:

Lebanese citizens watching Hezbollah leader Hassan Nasrallah on television as smoke rises from Israeli attacks aimed at Hezbollah strongholds in Beirut’s southern suburbs, 2006.

Credit: AP

(via d0ktar)



destroyed